The philosophy department has been seen as a neutral space from which thought germinates, not itself an object for reflection. And so one finds no explorations of the effects that disciplining might have had on philosophical theorizing, or of where else philosophers could be housed, or of how philosophers, by being located elsewhere, might have developed alternative accounts of the world or have come up with new ways and standards of philosophizing.

But when philosophers leave behind their disciplinary warrens, living and working elsewhere than in philosophy departments, their standards for their work change as well. It turns out that if you change the place and the audience you change the standards. Thus Socrates Tenured, the title of our latest book: Socrates is venerated, but not taken seriously. He’d never stand a chance of landing a job, let alone getting tenure, in a philosophy department today.

We’d like to change that.

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